The signs of a heart attack in women are often different from those in men.
The signs of a heart attack in women are often different from those in men.

It might not sound like a heart attack if you’re sweating, feeling sick, dizzy, and tired all the time. But women often have them, and they may happen more often when they are sleeping or asleep.

Women don't always have serious chest pain, pressure, or discomfort.
Women don’t always have serious chest pain, pressure, or discomfort.

Women don’t always have serious chest pain, pressure, or discomfort, and it’s not even always the most noticeable sign of a heart attack. Since women have different signs, they need to know what they mean and take steps to lower their risk of getting heart disease.

Chatura Alur, M.D., a general medicine doctor at the Mayo Clinic Health System in Mankato, says, “It’s important to first know what makes you more likely to get heart disease and then work to stop doing things that might make that risk worse.” “Some factors play a more significant role in the development of heart disease in women than what are considered the tradition risks, such as high cholesterol, obesity and high blood pressure.”

Read More: Why men die younger than women?

To help avoid heart disease, women should also do the following:

To help avoid heart disease, women should also do the following:
To help avoid heart disease, women should also do the following:
  • Diabetes
  • Stress and sadness in the mind
  • Smoking
  • A sedentary way of life

Heart disease risk may also go up for women who are going through menopause, broken heart syndrome, or problems during pregnancy.

Read More: Heart Attack Signs Are Different for Men and Women: Study

Heart disease is something that women of all ages should think about, says Dr. Alur. “Many women play down their symptoms and don’t get help until their hearts have been hurt so badly that they need to go to the emergency room.” We want women to know how important it is to pay attention to their bodies, know what feels normal, and get help before their symptoms get worse.
Heart Month is a great time to learn more about how women can get heart disease. You might not have known these things.

Women of all ages can get heart problems.

The American Heart Association says that young women who smoke and take birth control pills have a 20% higher chance of getting heart disease. The risk also goes up with age for women.

Obesity and eating too much are two things that can cause arteries to get blocked over time. Don’t let your age make you feel safe when you’re not.

Self-care isn’t the only way to avoid heart disease.

No matter how many veggies and yoga you do, you will still have a chance of getting heart disease. A lot of the time, family background is important.

Read More: Most depressed states in the U.S.

It can help to know your heart health numbers.

If heart disease runs in your family, or even before age 20, the American Heart Association says you should start getting your cholesterol checked. Also, make sure you get your blood pressure checked often.

Women can have heart problems without having any warning signs.

The American Heart Association says that 64% of women who die quickly from coronary heart disease had no warning signs.

When women show signs of a heart attack, those signs are often taken the wrong way. Women’s complaints, like shortness of breath, nausea, and back or jaw pain, are often not very clear. Some women feel dizzy or faint, have pain in their lower chest or upper belly, and are very tired. As soon as you feel like something is wrong, you should see a doctor.

From the Mayo Clinic

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